Dog Treats and Feeding | Foobler Dog Toy
As seen on TV

Some foods that are good for us are poisonous to your pal. That won’t stop him or her from begging for them and wolfing them down with apparent enjoyment. So what’s good for your dog and what isn’t?

Bones

I always believed that boiled marrow bones are safe and help a dog to keep his teeth clean. But if your dog is inclined to give a bone two or three chomps before swallowing the lot, you could end up with a dog who needs surgery – or even a fatality. You don’t want to learn this the hard way!

Chicken and fish bones are particularly dangerous, as is any bone from a BBQ. You can get away with it for years, but one day, a sharp bone could cause serious internal injuries. It’s a bit like Russian roulette. Don’t play it with your dog!

Canned food or dry food?

A good dry food will contain all the nutrients your dog needs, but if your dog has been ill and needs a protein boost, canned food will usually have a higher protein content.

Senior dogs with missing teeth will also prefer a soft food, but try to get grandpa dog to eat a bit of kibble too, or his remaining teeth will decay faster. There are some good kibbles for senior dogs that are crunchy outside and tender inside.

Soft foods are a nice treat for dogs, but on the whole, they’re not absolutely necessary. Add a few scoops of soft food to kibble from time to time as a nice, protein-rich treat. There are good things about both soft and crunchy foods, so a combination is best.

‘Human’ foods

Here are a few ‘people’ foods that you can use as treats – but use them with caution!

  • Apples: Remove pips first! The pips contain cyanide: not exactly the healthiest treat for your pup.
  • Eggs: In Australia, we’re lucky enough to have salmonella-free eggs. Cooked or raw, they’re a great protein booster, and the shells are full of calcium – but crush them up first. Don’t do this too often though – egg whites can cause a biotin deficiency.
  • Fish: Raw fish can contain parasites, so only allow your dog to eat cooked fish – and be extra careful about removing every bone.
  • Grains: Dog’s digestions are able to cope with grains. Rice with a little boiled, deboned chicken is a wonderful recovery food for pets with digestive trouble. Wheat or maize based food is ok for most dogs, but a few dogs are allergic to gluten. If you suspect a food allergy, see your vet.
  • Nuts: Be very cautious with nuts. Walnuts and macadamias are poisonous to dogs. Peanuts or cashews are ok, but make them the exception rather than the rule.
  • Pumpkin: Pumpkin is very good for dogs, but only in moderation. A couple of spoonsful is healthy, but more than that can lead to an upset tummy.
  • Dried meats: There have been concerns about some of the dog treats that are made in China. Dried meats can be a great treat for your pet, but use meats that were intended for human consumption to be on the safe side.
  • Mouldy food: It’s amazing what most dogs can eat without getting ill. All the same, mould allergies occur in certain dogs, so to be on the safe side, make sure the garbage can has a secure lid!

 

  • Meat: It’s a favourite! But make sure it’s properly cooked and remove bones.

 

Never give your dog these foods

This list could probably be even longer, but a lot of people give their dogs treats that are bad for them and could even be fatal. Common examples of foods your dog should never eat include:

  • Avocados can prove fatal
  • Baking soda and yeast – don’t’ let your dog lick out the mixing bowl!
  • Coffee or chocolate – even tea has too much caffeine.
  • Garlic, onions or chives.
  • Fruit pips and corn cobs.
  • Grapes or raisins.
  • Macadamias or walnuts.
  • Tomatoes.
  • Milk or other dairy products.

How often should I feed my dog?

There’s a fair amount of debate on this point. Most people say that once or twice-daily feeds are enough for adult dogs, and puppies should eat at least three to four times a day.

A new school of thought sees regular feeds as being closer to a dog’s natural foraging feeding pattern. Whether this is true or not, no-one can deny that dogs are interested in food all day long.

You can use this to your advantage by employing interactive toys like the Foobler to keep your dog entertained with regular feeds while you’re out. Remember to measure how much food your dog gets every day so that you don’t overfeed.

One thing that almost everyone agrees on is that ‘Free feeding’ where food is available all day long can lead to over-eating and obesity. Plus, it isn’t as satisfying for your dog.

Remember that the ‘recommended’ amount on dogfood packets is just a starting point. Your dog may need more or less food based on his digestion, metabolism and how active he or she may be. Use it as a starting point, factor in any treats, and monitor your pet’s condition.

 

 

 

Some foods that are good for us are poisonous to your pal. That won’t stop him or her from begging for them and wolfing them down with apparent enjoyment. So what’s good for your dog and what isn’t?

Bones

I always believed that boiled marrow bones are safe and help a dog to keep his teeth clean. But if your dog is inclined to give a bone two or three chomps before swallowing the lot, you could end up with a dog who needs surgery – or even a fatality. You don’t want to learn this the hard way!

Chicken and fish bones are particularly dangerous, as is any bone from a BBQ. You can get away with it for years, but one day, a sharp bone could cause serious internal injuries. It’s a bit like Russian roulette. Don’t play it with your dog!

Canned food or dry food?

A good dry food will contain all the nutrients your dog needs, but if your dog has been ill and needs a protein boost, canned food will usually have a higher protein content.

Senior dogs with missing teeth will also prefer a soft food, but try to get grandpa dog to eat a bit of kibble too, or his remaining teeth will decay faster. There are some good kibbles for senior dogs that are crunchy outside and tender inside.

Soft foods are a nice treat for dogs, but on the whole, they’re not absolutely necessary. Add a few scoops of soft food to kibble from time to time as a nice, protein-rich treat. There are good things about both soft and crunchy foods, so a combination is best.

Treat dos and donts

‘Human’ foods

Here are a few ‘people’ foods that you can use as treats – but use them with caution!

  • Apples: Remove pips first! The pips contain cyanide: not exactly the healthiest treat for your pup.
  • Eggs: In Australia, we’re lucky enough to have salmonella-free eggs. Cooked or raw, they’re a great protein booster, and the shells are full of calcium – but crush them up first. Don’t do this too often though – egg whites can cause a biotin deficiency.
  • Fish: Raw fish can contain parasites, so only allow your dog to eat cooked fish – and be extra careful about removing every bone.
  • Grains: Dog’s digestions are able to cope with grains. Rice with a little boiled, deboned chicken is a wonderful recovery food for pets with digestive trouble. Wheat or maize based food is ok for most dogs, but a few dogs are allergic to gluten. If you suspect a food allergy, see your vet.
  • Nuts: Be very cautious with nuts. Walnuts and macadamias are poisonous to dogs. Peanuts or cashews are ok, but make them the exception rather than the rule.
  • Pumpkin: Pumpkin is very good for dogs, but only in moderation. A couple of spoonsful is healthy, but more than that can lead to an upset tummy.
  • Dried meats: There have been concerns about some of the dog treats that are made in China. Dried meats can be a great treat for your pet, but use meats that were intended for human consumption to be on the safe side.
  • Mouldy food: It’s amazing what most dogs can eat without getting ill. All the same, mould allergies occur in certain dogs, so to be on the safe side, make sure the garbage can has a secure lid!
  • Meat: It’s a favourite! But make sure it’s properly cooked and remove bones.

Never give your dog these foods

This list could probably be even longer, but a lot of people give their dogs treats that are bad for them and could even be fatal. Common examples of foods your dog should never eat include:

  • Avocados can prove fatal
  • Baking soda and yeast – don’t’ let your dog lick out the mixing bowl!
  • Coffee or chocolate – even tea has too much caffeine.
  • Garlic, onions or chives.
  • Fruit pips and corn cobs.
  • Grapes or raisins.
  • Macadamias or walnuts.
  • Tomatoes.
  • Milk or other dairy products.

How often should I feed my dog?

There’s a fair amount of debate on this point. Most people say that once or twice-daily feeds are enough for adult dogs, and puppies should eat at least three to four times a day.

A new school of thought sees regular feeds as being closer to a dog’s natural foraging feeding pattern. Whether this is true or not, no-one can deny that dogs are interested in food all day long.

You can use this to your advantage by employing interactive toys like the Foobler to keep your dog entertained with regular feeds while you’re out. Remember to measure how much food your dog gets every day so that you don’t overfeed.

One thing that almost everyone agrees on is that ‘Free feeding’ where food is available all day long can lead to over-eating and obesity. Plus, it isn’t as satisfying for your dog.

Remember that the ‘recommended’ amount on dogfood packets is just a starting point. Your dog may need more or less food based on his digestion, metabolism and how active he or she may be. Use it as a starting point, factor in any treats, and monitor your pet’s condition.

Use it as a starting point, factor in any treats, and monitor your pet’s condition

 

Regards,

Peter and the Team at Foobler
www.foobler.com.au